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Lo. Likes fish, robots, necromancy, and long walks on the beach. This is my moodboard.
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    unexplained-events:

Being the only surgeon in the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, Leonid Rogozov (27) had to perform surgeory on himself when he found out that his appendix was inflamed and could burst any moment. With the assistance of a meteorologist and an engineer (and some local anesthesia) he removed his appendix. Bad ass

    unexplained-events:

    Being the only surgeon in the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, Leonid Rogozov (27) had to perform surgeory on himself when he found out that his appendix was inflamed and could burst any moment. With the assistance of a meteorologist and an engineer (and some local anesthesia) he removed his appendix. Bad ass

    (Source: unexplained-events)

    — 5 months ago with 7156 notes
    #medicine  #surgery  #history  #amazing  #russia  #soviet  #antartic  #expedition  #leonid rogozov  #queue 
    prepaidafrica:

Possibly one of the more unexpected products at Maker Faire Africa this year in Lagos is a urine powered generator, created by four girls. The girls are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15). 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity. (via Blog : Maker Faire Africa)

    prepaidafrica:

    Possibly one of the more unexpected products at Maker Faire Africa this year in Lagos is a urine powered generator, created by four girls. The girls are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15). 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity. (via Blog : Maker Faire Africa)

    (via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

    — 1 year ago with 4897 notes
    #Amazing 
    
In the late 1940s and ’50s, there was a mixed genre of picture narrative  in Japanese youth magazines that, as far as I know, does not have its  own name. It usually appeared under the rubric of “emonogatari”  (pronounced “eh-mono-gatari”)…
Like I said, as far as I know, there is no standard name for this hybrid  medium. The magazines and furoku booklets (premiums) that carry such  work advertise them as “emonogatari,” but if one opens them looking for  prose coupled with framed rectangular pictures, they will be  disappointed. There is still a heavy textual component, with strong  expository qualities, but now much more of the story is shown rather  than told. Still standard is the naturalistic illustrational style that  emonogatari derived from 1930s illustrated prose and kamishibai, but now  less sharp in line, sometimes clunky, less tableaux-like and more  fractured into dramatic “cinematic” details. The character and narrative  types are also fully in the tradition of emonogatari, kamishibai, and  prewar juvenile fiction. But there is increasing humor, some of which  seems derived from the movies, but many of the reflexive gags are  clearly inspired by Tezuka Osamu and his kin. The most obvious markers  of comics’ influence, however, are these works’ dynamic paneling, speech  balloons, and sound effects. Much of this imported formal language  suggests American comics over Japanese: round panels, big panels, shaped  panels, figures that are too fleshy to be from ’30s Japan, large  cartouches of text, and coloring (when there is coloring) that is often  close in palette to contemporary American comics. At least one youth  magazine at the time – Manga King (Manga ō) – included translations of American titles like Durango Kid, Lone Ranger, and Reed Crandall-era Blackhawk,  all licensed through the NANA (North American Newspaper Alliance) news  syndicate. One emonogatari Western from 1953 in the monthly Tankai  is advertised as a “talkie action emonogatari,” as if the insertion of  speech balloons and serial imagery signified sound cinema. But obviously  the major influence was comics, Japanese and especially American.

Soooo awesome.
There’s 5 pages of article on this stuff, with tons more amazing work to look at. GO LOOK http://www.tcj.com/emonogatari-in-the-age-of-comics-1948-1957/

    In the late 1940s and ’50s, there was a mixed genre of picture narrative in Japanese youth magazines that, as far as I know, does not have its own name. It usually appeared under the rubric of “emonogatari” (pronounced “eh-mono-gatari”)…

    Like I said, as far as I know, there is no standard name for this hybrid medium. The magazines and furoku booklets (premiums) that carry such work advertise them as “emonogatari,” but if one opens them looking for prose coupled with framed rectangular pictures, they will be disappointed. There is still a heavy textual component, with strong expository qualities, but now much more of the story is shown rather than told. Still standard is the naturalistic illustrational style that emonogatari derived from 1930s illustrated prose and kamishibai, but now less sharp in line, sometimes clunky, less tableaux-like and more fractured into dramatic “cinematic” details. The character and narrative types are also fully in the tradition of emonogatari, kamishibai, and prewar juvenile fiction. But there is increasing humor, some of which seems derived from the movies, but many of the reflexive gags are clearly inspired by Tezuka Osamu and his kin. The most obvious markers of comics’ influence, however, are these works’ dynamic paneling, speech balloons, and sound effects. Much of this imported formal language suggests American comics over Japanese: round panels, big panels, shaped panels, figures that are too fleshy to be from ’30s Japan, large cartouches of text, and coloring (when there is coloring) that is often close in palette to contemporary American comics. At least one youth magazine at the time – Manga King (Manga ō) – included translations of American titles like Durango Kid, Lone Ranger, and Reed Crandall-era Blackhawk, all licensed through the NANA (North American Newspaper Alliance) news syndicate. One emonogatari Western from 1953 in the monthly Tankai is advertised as a “talkie action emonogatari,” as if the insertion of speech balloons and serial imagery signified sound cinema. But obviously the major influence was comics, Japanese and especially American.

    Soooo awesome.

    There’s 5 pages of article on this stuff, with tons more amazing work to look at. GO LOOK http://www.tcj.com/emonogatari-in-the-age-of-comics-1948-1957/

    — 2 years ago with 6 notes
    #comics  #japanese  #history  #vintage  #art  #omg  #amazing 

    designlikeyougiveafuck:

    “Your rainbow panorama” of the Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. The new project was opened on the 28th of May 2011 on the top of the ARoS Aarhus Kunstmuseum.

    More Eliasson!

    I wanna experience an Eliasson piece before I die. :[

    — 2 years ago with 4309 notes
    #eliasson  #art  #installation  #rainbow  #amazing 

    unknownskywalker:

    The Universe. It’s Just Not That Into You by Jeremy Huggins

    A series of five prints describing ways in which the universe is potentially out to get you. Buy prints at Etsy.

    LOVE this.

    (via itsfullofstars)

    — 2 years ago with 1056 notes
    #space  #art  #illustration  #design  #amazing  #want 

    Oh man, these are so gorgeous. I love these kinds of little design exercises. They make me so happy. |3

    See the rest by Nicole Meyer here!

    — 2 years ago with 10 notes
    #design  #nature  #parks  #logos  #amazing  #awesome  #art