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    fuckyeahfeminists:

rhrealitycheck:

Cost Of Birth Control Higher In Some Low-Income Neighborhoods Than In Wealthy Ones

Researchers focused on the price of seven commonly-used contraceptives — including various forms of the pill as well as transvaginal options like the ring. They cross-referenced the price information across various counties with median household incomes from the 2010 census.
Nearly every prescription contraceptive was more expensive in low-income zip codes, the researchers found.
In most cases, price differed by just a few dollars. For two of the contraceptives, the cost was significantly less in the wealthiest zip codes.
Researchers said they don’t know the reason for the price discrepancies. Certain neighborhoods may not have a large, chain pharmacy that offers lower prices and runs specials, Zite speculated.
“There is other research that has shown that a lot of needs for health, like fruits and vegetables, are more expensive in lower-income neighborhoods,” Zite added.


uh oh is this going to start another fight that healthy food isn’t actually expensive and poor people just dont try hard enough to eat well because “duh my family eats sooo many veggies with little money, so everyone is able to do it!”

    fuckyeahfeminists:

    rhrealitycheck:

    Cost Of Birth Control Higher In Some Low-Income Neighborhoods Than In Wealthy Ones

    Researchers focused on the price of seven commonly-used contraceptives — including various forms of the pill as well as transvaginal options like the ring. They cross-referenced the price information across various counties with median household incomes from the 2010 census.

    Nearly every prescription contraceptive was more expensive in low-income zip codes, the researchers found.

    In most cases, price differed by just a few dollars. For two of the contraceptives, the cost was significantly less in the wealthiest zip codes.

    Researchers said they don’t know the reason for the price discrepancies. Certain neighborhoods may not have a large, chain pharmacy that offers lower prices and runs specials, Zite speculated.

    “There is other research that has shown that a lot of needs for health, like fruits and vegetables, are more expensive in lower-income neighborhoods,” Zite added.

    uh oh is this going to start another fight that healthy food isn’t actually expensive and poor people just dont try hard enough to eat well because “duh my family eats sooo many veggies with little money, so everyone is able to do it!”

    (Source: The Huffington Post)

    — 11 months ago with 2970 notes
    #photo  #link  #birth control  #money  #news  #queue 
    REBLOG IF YOU AREN’T PREGNANT

    bountyhunterdwe:

    I am on tumblr day and night…you think I am getting laid?

     I’m only pregnant in Arizona.

    Forever pregnant in Arizona.

    (via portland-mando)

    — 1 year ago with 375954 notes
    #pregnant  #pregnancy  #arizona  #stupid law  #stupid state  #women's healthcare  #or you know just  #healthcare  #birth control  #abortion 
    fuckyeahfeminists:

Why do so many women end up on the pill when it fails them?

Women overestimate the effectiveness of the Pill and condoms — the two most popular methods of birth control in this country — according to a new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. After the study group of 4,100 women was counseled about other methods of birth control, such as IUDs, 71 percent chose to go on that or an implant. The findings suggest that many women choose the Pill because they don’t receive thorough counseling about their other birth control options or the true effectiveness of the Pill — which isn’t as great as pharmaceutical companies tell you it is.
This helps explain why the most popular methods of contraception in this country are the birth control Pill and condoms — if you don’t know all the information about all the methods of contraception available to you, why would you choose the one you know the least about? What many women don’t know about the Pill is that only if you take it exactly according to the manufacturer’s instructions, including at the same time every day, that your chances of getting pregnant are 0.3 percent. But for whatever reason — business or forgetfulness — many women don’t take the Pill exactly according to the instructions, bringing its real failure rate to a rather startling 9 percent, according to Dr. Nancy Stanwood, obstetrician/gynecologist and board member of Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health. That means that nearly one out of 10 women will get pregnant while taking the Pill over the course of a year.

Read the rest at Buzzfeed

I take the pill because I’ve been poked and prodded and threatened with intra-muscular shots enough as it is, and they wouldn’t give me a partial hysterectomy like I’d asked. :P (I guess that’s what I get for sounding like I was joking or something… no really, Mr. Surgeon, you don’t have any idea how much I don’t ever want to get pregnant.)

    fuckyeahfeminists:

    Why do so many women end up on the pill when it fails them?

    Women overestimate the effectiveness of the Pill and condoms — the two most popular methods of birth control in this country — according to a new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. After the study group of 4,100 women was counseled about other methods of birth control, such as IUDs, 71 percent chose to go on that or an implant. The findings suggest that many women choose the Pill because they don’t receive thorough counseling about their other birth control options or the true effectiveness of the Pill — which isn’t as great as pharmaceutical companies tell you it is.

    This helps explain why the most popular methods of contraception in this country are the birth control Pill and condoms — if you don’t know all the information about all the methods of contraception available to you, why would you choose the one you know the least about? What many women don’t know about the Pill is that only if you take it exactly according to the manufacturer’s instructions, including at the same time every day, that your chances of getting pregnant are 0.3 percent. But for whatever reason — business or forgetfulness — many women don’t take the Pill exactly according to the instructions, bringing its real failure rate to a rather startling 9 percent, according to Dr. Nancy Stanwood, obstetrician/gynecologist and board member of Physicians for Reproductive Choice and Health. That means that nearly one out of 10 women will get pregnant while taking the Pill over the course of a year.

    Read the rest at Buzzfeed

    I take the pill because I’ve been poked and prodded and threatened with intra-muscular shots enough as it is, and they wouldn’t give me a partial hysterectomy like I’d asked. :P (I guess that’s what I get for sounding like I was joking or something… no really, Mr. Surgeon, you don’t have any idea how much I don’t ever want to get pregnant.)

    — 1 year ago with 222 notes
    #health care  #birth control  #sex  #contraception 
    womenaresociety:

Senate Rejects Step Targeting Coverage of Birth Control
The Senate on Thursday upheld President Obama’s birth control policy, voting to kill a Republican effort to let employers and health insurance companies deny coverage for contraceptives and other items they object to on religious or moral grounds.
 
The 51-to-48 vote illustrated a sharp divide between the parties and brought to the Congressional forefront the social issues that have roiled the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Over four days of debate, Democrats accused Republicans of infringing on women’s rights and focusing on issues long settled while Republicans accused Democrats of threatening religious freedom and violating the Constitution.
“The Senate will not allow women’s health care choices to be taken away from them,” said Senator Patty Murray, Democrat of Washington.
The politically charged fight heated up last month after the Obama administration unveiled its policy requiring health insurance plans to offer free contraceptives for women — a rule that provoked furious criticism from Roman Catholic institutions and some other religious groups. The administration quickly offered a revision that would force the health insurers — not the institutions — to bear the cost.
Still, Senate Republicans tried to seize on the uproar surrounding the administration rule and offered a Senate proposal that would allow a broad exemption for employers, framing it as a matter of conscience as much as contraception.
“The president is trampling on religious freedom,” said Senator Mike Johanns, Republican of Nebraska.
Democrats saw the issue tilting politically in their favor in recent days and forced the Senate vote even as some Republicans indicated unease about pressing the matter. One Republican, Senator Olympia J. Snowe of Maine, joined 48 Democrats and two independents in opposing the plan, days after she announced she was retiring from the Senate. Three Democratic senators — Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Joe Manchin III of West Virginia and Ben Nelson of Nebraska — voted for the proposal, along with 45 Republicans. Mr. Casey and Mr. Manchin are up for re-election this year. Mr. Nelson is retiring.
Despite the vote, Congress is not done with the contraception debate. Speaker John A. Boehner said Thursday that House Republicans also wanted to protect religious employers who object to the requirement for contraceptive coverage.
“It’s important for us to win this issue,” Mr. Boehner said. He did not offer any details about a legislative path forward, but hinted that it would differ from the one tried by Senate Republicans.
Illustrating the political power of the issue, Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate, moved quickly on Wednesday to clarify a comment that he was against the Republican plan by Senator Roy Blunt, Republican of Missouri. Mr. Romney said that he had misunderstood the question and that he supported Mr. Blunt’s proposal. Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. weighed in on the issue during a visit to Iowa State University on Thursday, saying that the administration plan was “screwed up in the first iteration” but that the compromise was the correct approach.
In the Senate, Democrats, defending the new health care law, said the Republican proposal went far beyond contraception and would allow employers to deny coverage for other items and services to which they objected.
Senator Barbara A. Mikulski, Democrat of Maryland, said Republicans were attacking women’s health care as part of “a systematic war against women.”
Mr. Blunt offered the proposal as an amendment to a highway bill. Under the proposal, health insurance plans and employers could refuse to provide or pay for coverage of “specific items or services” if the coverage would be “contrary to the religious beliefs or moral convictions of the sponsor, issuer or other entity offering the plan.”
Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, urged the Senate to reject the proposal. “The Obama administration believes that decisions about medical care should be made by a woman and her doctor, not a woman and her boss,” Ms. Sebelius said.
*Click above link to continue reading. Please CLICK HERE to take 10 seconds to thank your senators for voting to protect women’s health & urge them to keep up the fight.

    womenaresociety:

    Senate Rejects Step Targeting Coverage of Birth Control

    The Senate on Thursday upheld President Obama’s birth control policy, voting to kill a Republican effort to let employers and health insurance companies deny coverage for contraceptives and other items they object to on religious or moral grounds.

    The 51-to-48 vote illustrated a sharp divide between the parties and brought to the Congressional forefront the social issues that have roiled the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Over four days of debate, Democrats accused Republicans of infringing on women’s rights and focusing on issues long settled while Republicans accused Democrats of threatening religious freedom and violating the Constitution.

    “The Senate will not allow women’s health care choices to be taken away from them,” said Senator Patty Murray, Democrat of Washington.

    The politically charged fight heated up last month after the Obama administration unveiled its policy requiring health insurance plans to offer free contraceptives for women — a rule that provoked furious criticism from Roman Catholic institutions and some other religious groups. The administration quickly offered a revision that would force the health insurers — not the institutions — to bear the cost.

    Still, Senate Republicans tried to seize on the uproar surrounding the administration rule and offered a Senate proposal that would allow a broad exemption for employers, framing it as a matter of conscience as much as contraception.

    “The president is trampling on religious freedom,” said Senator Mike Johanns, Republican of Nebraska.

    Democrats saw the issue tilting politically in their favor in recent days and forced the Senate vote even as some Republicans indicated unease about pressing the matter. One Republican, Senator Olympia J. Snowe of Maine, joined 48 Democrats and two independents in opposing the plan, days after she announced she was retiring from the Senate. Three Democratic senators — Bob Casey of Pennsylvania, Joe Manchin III of West Virginia and Ben Nelson of Nebraska — voted for the proposal, along with 45 Republicans. Mr. Casey and Mr. Manchin are up for re-election this year. Mr. Nelson is retiring.

    Despite the vote, Congress is not done with the contraception debate. Speaker John A. Boehner said Thursday that House Republicans also wanted to protect religious employers who object to the requirement for contraceptive coverage.

    “It’s important for us to win this issue,” Mr. Boehner said. He did not offer any details about a legislative path forward, but hinted that it would differ from the one tried by Senate Republicans.

    Illustrating the political power of the issue, Mitt Romney, the Republican presidential candidate, moved quickly on Wednesday to clarify a comment that he was against the Republican plan by Senator Roy Blunt, Republican of Missouri. Mr. Romney said that he had misunderstood the question and that he supported Mr. Blunt’s proposal. Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. weighed in on the issue during a visit to Iowa State University on Thursday, saying that the administration plan was “screwed up in the first iteration” but that the compromise was the correct approach.

    In the Senate, Democrats, defending the new health care law, said the Republican proposal went far beyond contraception and would allow employers to deny coverage for other items and services to which they objected.

    Senator Barbara A. Mikulski, Democrat of Maryland, said Republicans were attacking women’s health care as part of “a systematic war against women.”

    Mr. Blunt offered the proposal as an amendment to a highway bill. Under the proposal, health insurance plans and employers could refuse to provide or pay for coverage of “specific items or services” if the coverage would be “contrary to the religious beliefs or moral convictions of the sponsor, issuer or other entity offering the plan.”

    Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, urged the Senate to reject the proposal. “The Obama administration believes that decisions about medical care should be made by a woman and her doctor, not a woman and her boss,” Ms. Sebelius said.

    *Click above link to continue reading. Please CLICK HERE to take 10 seconds to thank your senators for voting to protect women’s health & urge them to keep up the fight.

    — 2 years ago with 41 notes
    #senators  #senate  #vote  #women's rights  #healthcare  #women's health  #controversy  #birth control  #contraception  #health insurance  #religion  #moral  #catholic  #olympia j snowe  #olympia snowe  #mitt romney  #joe biden  #barbara mikulski  #roy blunt  #kathleen sebelius  #obama  #obama administration  #patty murray 

    womenaresociety:

    fuckyeah-nerdery:

    Middle aged men explain why middle aged men know more about women’s health than women. I lul’d.

    I love Nick Offerman.

    — 2 years ago with 1083 notes
    #birth control  #funny or die  #misogyny  #nick offerman  #planned parenthood  #sexism  #sexist  #video  #women's health  #women's health experts  #reproductive health  #contraception 
    No Women on Congress' Birth Control Panel →

    keepyourboehneroutofmyuterus:

    Is there anything else that needs to be said about that fucked up farce and waste of tax-payer money that happened today in DC?

    (Source: keepyourbsoutofmyuterus)

    — 2 years ago with 43 notes
    #birth control  #reproductive rights  #politics  #fucked up farce 
    First period in a few years. Wow how did I do this every month?

    slumberblues:

    aquapunk:

    I just want to lay in bed with a heating pad and wear several layers of pajamas and sweatshirts.

    Continuous BC is the shit, just don’t forget to take 2 pills in a row over the course of a couple days otherwise you’ll get period’d.

    Oh? You didn’t know you can skip your placebo/blank pills and take your hormone pills every day to avoid periods altogether instead?

    Well, FYI, you can, and I’m sure there are plenty of non-medical reasons why this isn’t common knowledge. Here’s a link to the wikipedia article about it. It’s quite unfortunate that most doctors and other sources of legitimate information about contraception methods completely omit this when discussion options, but hopefully it will catch on. Granted, nobody knows what the long-term side effects are, but I don’t know how missing out on a few days of no hormones would be worse than going through with the regular routine and getting a fake period. Aside from that, there just seems to be a lot of cultural suspicion about women not having periods… period, and I’m sure that has a lot to do with why this is so hush-hush.

    Naturally my body takes a period once every six months ago or so. I started taking the pill to keep myself going once a month, or if I did the taking two packs to skip a period I ended up with two months worth of symptoms. Twice the cramps, twice the upset stomach.

    So I stopped taking them a couple months ago, because I came to the realisation that I do not like having my period. It’s gross, smelly, makes me break out in spots and pads are bad for the environment and my sex drive became so low I think I was getting depressed about it.

    Not only that but the pill increases the chance of breast cancer and blood clots forming in the vein. 

    Blood clots, yes. Breast cancer… yes and no. From cancer.gov:

    A woman’s risk of developing breast cancer depends on several factors, some of which are related to her natural hormones. … A 1996 analysis of worldwide epidemiologic data conducted by the Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer found that women who were current or recent users of birth control pills had a slightly elevated risk of developing breast cancer. The risk was highest for women who started using OCs as teenagers. However, 10 or more years after women stopped using OCs, their risk of developing breast cancer returned to the same level as if they had never used birth control pills… In addition, breast cancers diagnosed in women after 10 or more years of not using OCs were less advanced than breast cancers diagnosed in women who had never used OCs.

    The studies linking the pill to breast cancer also sometimes contradict each other; some saying there is a link, and others saying there isn’t. Oral contraceptives actually decrease the risk in developing ovarian and cervical cancers, though, and increase the risk of liver cancer.

    So for somebody like me, who runs a 45% risk of having my endo grow back in the year post-surgery (only to have that percentage go up every year afterward), this is like… not taking my Lipitor to help keep my high cholesterol at bay.

    So really, it all depends on your body chemistry and your personal circumstances. But the continuous pill regimen thing really does need to get out more.

    — 2 years ago with 37 notes
    #birth control  #oral contraceptive  #medicine  #health 
    First period in a few years. Wow how did I do this every month?

    I just want to lay in bed with a heating pad and wear several layers of pajamas and sweatshirts.

    Continuous BC is the shit, just don’t forget to take 2 pills in a row over the course of a couple days otherwise you’ll get period’d.

    Oh? You didn’t know you can skip your placebo/blank pills and take your hormone pills every day to avoid periods altogether instead?

    Well, FYI, you can, and I’m sure there are plenty of non-medical reasons why this isn’t common knowledge. Here’s a link to the wikipedia article about it. It’s quite unfortunate that most doctors and other sources of legitimate information about contraception methods completely omit this when discussion options, but hopefully it will catch on. Granted, nobody knows what the long-term side effects are, but I don’t know how missing out on a few days of no hormones would be worse than going through with the regular routine and getting a fake period. Aside from that, there just seems to be a lot of cultural suspicion about women not having periods… period, and I’m sure that has a lot to do with why this is so hush-hush.

    — 2 years ago with 37 notes
    #birth control  #oral contraception  #medicine  #health 
    "A great effort has been made to make condoms more pleasurable for men, but you don’t hear about this same effort going toward reducing the negative impact of contraception on women’s sexual functioning."

    Nicole Smith, lead researcher on an Indiana University study that examines the sexual side effects of all hormonal forms of birth control. (via newsweek)

    This is relevant to… keeping me from going under the knife again soon.

    (via fuckyeahfeminists)

    — 2 years ago with 397 notes
    #birth control  #contraception  #women's health  #sexuality