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ROBOTS, FISH, etc.

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Lo. Likes fish, robots, necromancy, and long walks on the beach. This is my moodboard.
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Professional-er Art Blog || Aquapunk || Transcostumers

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    cognitivedissonance:

The best app, hands down. It has tips on what to do when confronted by law enforcement in various situations, and the ability to discretely record audio and video.
If you’ve ever had an encounter with the police that you wish you could record, here’s your ticket.
A word of caution: Some states and municipalities prohibit recording police and/or recording third parties. Know the law in your state and your city. However, and this is my non-legal opinion, it’s better to be safe than sorry when encountering possible police hostility/brutality.

    cognitivedissonance:

    The best app, hands down. It has tips on what to do when confronted by law enforcement in various situations, and the ability to discretely record audio and video.

    If you’ve ever had an encounter with the police that you wish you could record, here’s your ticket.

    A word of caution: Some states and municipalities prohibit recording police and/or recording third parties. Know the law in your state and your city. However, and this is my non-legal opinion, it’s better to be safe than sorry when encountering possible police hostility/brutality.

    (via chauvinistsushi)

    — 1 year ago with 124 notes
    #police  #ACLU  #Know your rights  #app  #smartphone  #civil rights  #Police tape 
    thinkmexican:

We Will Not Comply! But Let’s Help Those Unsure of Their Rights
While many in Arizona shout “We will not comply!”, many more are afraid to leave home, unsure of their rights.
You can help Puente inform the community. Check out this call to action.
Visit Alto Arizona’s Action Center for more details.

    thinkmexican:

    We Will Not Comply! But Let’s Help Those Unsure of Their Rights

    While many in Arizona shout “We will not comply!”, many more are afraid to leave home, unsure of their rights.

    You can help Puente inform the community. Check out this call to action.

    Visit Alto Arizona’s Action Center for more details.

    (Source: thinkmexican)

    — 1 year ago with 40 notes
    #SB 1070  #Arizona  #Racial Profiling  #Civil Rights  #Protest  #Art  #Photos 
    Peak freedom?

    hautepop:

    I read an article a week ago which argued that this - here, now - is what peak oil looks like

    A decade ago, those few of us who were paying attention to peak oil were pointing out that if the peak of global conventional petroleum production arrived before any meaningful steps were taken, the price of oil would rise to previously unimagined heights, crippling the global economy and pushing political systems across the industrial world into a rising spiral of dysfunction and internal conflict.

    With most grades of oil above $100 a barrel, economies around the world mired in a paper “recovery” worse than most recessions, and the United States and European Union both frozen in political stalemates between regional and cultural blocs with radically irreconcilable agendas, that prophecy has turned out to be pretty much square on the money, but you won’t hear many people mention that these days.

    The point that has to be grasped just now, it seems to me, is that this is what peak oil looks like. Get past the fantasies of sudden collapse on the one hand, and the fantasies of limitless progress on the other, and what you get is what we’re getting—a long ragged slope of rising energy prices, economic contraction, and political failure, punctuated with a crisis here, a local or regional catastrophe there, a war somewhere else—all against a backdrop of disintegrating infrastructure, declining living standards, decreasing access to health care and similar services, and the like, which of course has been happening here in the United States for some years already.

    [John Michael Greer, What Peak Oil Looks Like, 7 December 2011]

    What if we have also reached ‘peak freedom’ - the maximum extent of individual freedoms and civil liberties?

    Europe and America became considerably more free through the 19th and 20th centuries. Slavery was abolished; women gained the vote; homosexuality decriminalised and employment and welfare reforms provided a baseline of freedom from exploitation and freedom for all to have a chance at a decent living. We gained the right to unionise; to (all) own private property; that everyone could access legal representation through legal aid if they couldn’t afford their own defence. From the Chatterley trial, to journalist’s privilege not to name sources, to the rise of internet we have gained increasing freedoms of thought and expression.

    Where next?

    Wednesday I met up with an old, old friend by name of @metaleptic. We talked about 2011 and the coming end of the world - and what felt significant about our conversation is that perhaps for the first time I was as pessimistic as him.

    What happened in 2011?

    • The Met Police, Tory government and supposedly independent judiciary (hah!) seeking to criminalise all forms of protest that aren’t walking along a pre-determined march route (and how long will they keep authorising big protest marches, you wonder?)
    • Kettling, mass arrests, police infiltrators, 944 deaths in police custody since 1990. Et cetera
    • The US Senate overwhelmingly passed the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) which gives the military (not the police) authority over domestic terror investigations and interrogations…
    • …allows for indefinite detention without trial of absolutely anyone suspected of being a terrorist…
    • …and defines the whole of the United States as a “battlefield”.
    • The normalisation of drone warfare and extra-judicial killings of British citizens in Pakistan, a country we are not at war with
    • SOPA and the Digital Economy Act threatening basic internet freedoms

    What’s coming in the rest of my lifetime?

    • The start of a four-degree or more rise in global temperatures, leading to extreme weather events and potentially the total loss of climate equilibrium (then god knows what)
    • The oil runs out, as does rather a lot of minerals we use to make rather a lot of things
    • The water runs out and large parts of the globe become uninhabitable
    • Starving and/or displaced people in the billions
    • Fortress Europe to (try to) keep them out of our (collapsing) economies and welfare states
    • A geriatric population in the West no longer producing wealth but functioning as a massive voting block to stymie any change. (Actually Hugo and I did disagree here - he’s more cynical and doubts even the veneer of democracy, voting etc will survive. I predict a mere move through simulacra into simulation.)

    Given that, then - Year of Protest or not - how is there any likelihood that the world will get more free?

    The question becomes simply when we passed the peak - before or after 9/11?

    (via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

    — 2 years ago with 40 notes
    #politics  #freedom  #oil  #censorship  #civil rights 
    fuckyeahfeminists:

TRIGGER WARNING: Graphic image of police brutality against civil rights activists.
life:

In the mid-20th century, America experienced a painful and long-overdue  reckoning for the most inhuman societal injustices in its history — the  stark racial inequalities that gave the lie to the nickname “land of  the free.” And LIFE was there, recording the triumphs, frustrations, and  martyrdoms of the civil rights movement’s heroes — and the gloating  hatred that fueled the era’s villains.
Pictured: During a nonviolent march demanding desegregation in public facilities  in Birmingham, Alabama, the city’s infamously racist public-safety  chief, Bull Connor, ordered firefighters to turn high-pressure firehoses  on the peaceful demonstrators.
(see more — LIFE at 75: Best Civil Rights Photos)

    fuckyeahfeminists:

    TRIGGER WARNING: Graphic image of police brutality against civil rights activists.

    life:

    In the mid-20th century, America experienced a painful and long-overdue reckoning for the most inhuman societal injustices in its history — the stark racial inequalities that gave the lie to the nickname “land of the free.” And LIFE was there, recording the triumphs, frustrations, and martyrdoms of the civil rights movement’s heroes — and the gloating hatred that fueled the era’s villains.

    Pictured: During a nonviolent march demanding desegregation in public facilities in Birmingham, Alabama, the city’s infamously racist public-safety chief, Bull Connor, ordered firefighters to turn high-pressure firehoses on the peaceful demonstrators.

    (see more LIFE at 75: Best Civil Rights Photos)

    — 2 years ago with 1273 notes
    #history  #Birmingham  #civil rights 
    Eve Ensler: Over It.

    katawalsh:

    “I am over rape.

    I am over rape culture, rape mentality, rape pages on Facebook.

    I am over the thousands of people who signed those pages with their real names without shame.

    I am over people demanding their right to rape pages, and calling it freedom of speech or justifying it as a joke.

    I am over people not understanding that rape is not a joke and I am over being told I don’t have a sense of humor, and women don’t have a sense of humor, when most women I know (and I know a lot) are really fucking funny. We just don’t think that uninvited penises up our anus, or our vagina is a laugh riot.

    I am over how long it seems to take anyone to ever respond to rape.

    I am over Facebook taking weeks to take down rape pages.

    I am over the hundreds of thousands of women in Congo still waiting for the rapes to end and the rapists to be held accountable.

    I am over the thousands of women in Bosnia, Burma, Pakistan, South Africa, Guatemala, Sierra Leone, Haiti, Afghanistan, Libya, you name a place, still waiting for justice.

    I am over rape happening in broad daylight.

    I am over the 207 clinics in Ecuador supported by the government that are capturing, raping, and torturing lesbians to make them straight.

    I am over one in three women in the U.S military (Happy Veterans Day!) getting raped by their so-called “comrades.”

    I am over the forces that deny women who have been raped the right to have an abortion.

    I am over the fact that after four women came forward with allegations that Herman Cain groped them and grabbed them and humiliated them, he is still running for the President of the United States.

    And I’m over CNBC debate host Maria Bartiromo getting booed when she asked him about it. She was booed, not Herman Cain.

    Which reminds me, I am so over the students at Penn State who protested the justice system instead of the alleged rapist pedophile of at least 8 boys, or his boss Joe Paterno, who did nothing to protect those children after knowing what was happening to them.

    I am over rape victims becoming re-raped when they go public.

    I am over starving Somalian women being raped at the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya, and I am over women getting raped at Occupy Wall Street and being quiet about it because they were protecting a movement which is fighting to end the pillaging and raping of the economy and the earth, as if the rape of their bodies was something separate.

    I am over women still being silent about rape, because they are made to believe it’s their fault or they did something to make it happen.

    I am over violence against women not being a #1 international priority when one out of three women will be raped or beaten in her lifetime — the destruction and muting and undermining of women is the destruction of life itself.

    No women, no future, duh.

    I am over this rape culture where the privileged with political and physical and economic might, take what and who they want, when they want it, as much as they want, any time they want it.

    I am over the endless resurrection of the careers of rapists and sexual exploiters — film directors, world leaders, corporate executives, movie stars, athletes — while the lives of the women they violated are permanently destroyed, often forcing them to live in social and emotional exile.

    I am over the passivity of good men. Where the hell are you?

    You live with us, make love with us, father us, befriend us, brother us, get nurtured and mothered and eternally supported by us, so why aren’t you standing with us? Why aren’t you driven to the point of madness and action by the rape and humiliation of us?

    I am over years and years of being over rape.

    And thinking about rape every day of my life since I was 5-years-old.

    And getting sick from rape, and depressed from rape, and enraged by rape.

    And reading my insanely crowded inbox of rape horror stories every hour of every single day.

    I am over being polite about rape. It’s been too long now, we have been too understanding.

    We need to OCCUPYRAPE in every school, park, radio, TV station, household, office, factory, refugee camp, military base, back room, night club, alleyway, courtroom, UN office. We need people to truly try and imagine — once and for all — what it feels like to have your body invaded, your mind splintered, your soul shattered. We need to let our rage and our compassion connect us so we can change the paradigm of global rape.

    There are approximately one billion women on the planet who have been violated.

    ONE BILLION WOMEN.

    The time is now. Prepare for the escalation.

    Today it begins, moving toward February 14, 2013, when one billion women will rise to end rape.

    Because we are over it.”

    If you tell me a rape joke, something like this list runs through my head. That’s why I’m not laughing; I’m actually seriously thinking about what benefits my associating with you are.

    (Source: The Huffington Post, via feministdisney)

    — 2 years ago with 1168 notes
    #feminism  #rape culture  #civil rights  #human rights  #seixsm  #patriarchy  #mysogyny 
    Cruel and Unusual Idiocy →

    Last week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Minneci v. Pollard, a case that involves cruelties inflicted on a prisoner that should be considered violations of the Eighth Amendment, which prohibits “cruel and unusual punishment.” There is, however, an unfortunate catch. Because Pollard was held in a privately operated prison, both his jailers and the federal government are claiming that his constitutional rights could not have been violated. A Court decision accepting this argument would have devastating consequences given the increasing privatization of state and federal prisons. Jails could violate the rights of prisoners at will, operating outside of constitutional restraints.

    Richard Lee Pollard was being held on a 20-month prison sentence when he fractured both of his elbows. This was just the beginning of his litany of painful medical issues. The prison’s chief of security made him remove his sling and put on his jumpsuit, even though lifting his arms caused him excruciating pain. He was then forced to wear a complicated handcuff-and-chain device colloquially known as a “black box,” which put agonizing downward pressure on his broken arms for more than six hours. The prison’s medical staff denied Pollard the treatments recommended by independent medical professionals, preventing him from receiving a splint or medical therapy. He then had to perform physical labor in the prison kitchen. Officials at the prison, in other words, inflicted unnecessary short- and long-term pain on a prisoner for no good reason.

    Exempting private prisons from constitutional oversight is particularly perverse given that, if anything, conditions in private prisons are likely to be worse than government-run prisons. Banking on Bondage, a disturbing and comprehensive American Civil Liberties Union report on private prisons, makes for grim reading. Private prisons now house nearly 10 percent of adult inmates and 50 percent of juvenile prisoners. But not only has the use of private prisons failed to save the government money, such facilities lack incentives to provide adequate conditions or reduce recidivism. Private prisons generally have higher rates of violence, both among inmates and between inmates and staff. Staff members are generally have less training than their counterparts in government-run prisons, and turnover is higher, making constitutional violations more likely. To exempt these facilities from constitutional oversight would be a disaster.

    Both the prison and the federal government in this case argue that Pollard’s suit should be rejected because he could advance legal claims under state law. But prisoners are the ultimate unpopular minority, and neither state legislatures nor elected state judges have much incentive to protect their rights. Constitutional protections enforced by federal courts are crucial to ensuring the safety of prisoners and of the communities they will be released into.

    Unfortunately, the oral argument last week strongly suggests that the Supreme Court will overrule the Ninth Circuit and deny Pollard’s federal claim. This would be a serious mistake. As more and more prisoners are housed in private institutions, decreasing oversight is the last thing that we should be doing. Denying Pollard a constitutional remedy for the cruelty inflicted on him would be the latest case of the Roberts Court unacceptably watering down constitutional protections.

    FUCK OFFFF

    (Source: abbyjean, via socialistexan)

    — 2 years ago with 103 notes
    #prison system  #civil rights 
    themunchkym:

sallography:

i can never not reblog this.
I will always reblog this.
 It’s an automatic reblog.
 that’s so sick. Rewarded for killing people but hated for loving them. This whole world is corrupt.

Beautifully written. Powerful words. I am so glad that DADT was repealed. :)

    themunchkym:

    sallography:

    i can never not reblog this.

    I will always reblog this.

     It’s an automatic reblog.

     that’s so sick. Rewarded for killing people but hated for loving them. This whole world is corrupt.

    Beautifully written. Powerful words. I am so glad that DADT was repealed. :)

    (via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

    — 2 years ago with 745800 notes
    #civil rights  #war 
    Open Letter to Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi of UC Davis →

    Linda P.B. Katehi,

    I am a junior faculty member at UC Davis. I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of English, and I teach in the Program in Critical Theory and in Science & Technology Studies. I have a strong record of research, teaching, and service. I am currently a Board Member of the Davis Faculty Association. I have also taken an active role in supporting the student movement to defend public education on our campus and throughout the UC system. In a word: I am the sort of young faculty member, like many of my colleagues, this campus needs. I am an asset to the University of California at Davis.

    You are not.

    I write to you and to my colleagues for three reasons…

    — 2 years ago with 3 notes
    #UC Davis  #protests  #police state  #student protesters  #civil rights  #disappoint  #current events 
    navigatethestream:

TW FOR ANTI-GSM VIOLENCE
adtvnow:

Trans Woman Shelley Hilliard Died By Fire. Why The Deadly New Trend In Queer-Bashing?
 
There’s a hot new trend in bashing LGBTs this fall and it involves setting them on fire. There have been at least four such attacks in the last three weeks—the latest being murdered trans woman Shelley Hilliard. But is there any reason behind this hateful trend? One expert thinks so. 
First Steven Iorio’s “friends” doused him in rum and set him ablaze while he slept. After that, someone in Scotland tied Stuart Walker to a post and burned him to death. Then three punks gave Burke Burnett third-degree burns by tossing him onto a fire during a party.
Now the latest victim in this ghastly trend is 19-year-old Shelley Hilliard, a Detroit trans woman whose charred corpse was identifiable only by the tattoo of cherries on her upper right arm.
So what’s behind this ultra-cruel fad in burning queers? Phillip M. Miner of The Center for Homicide Research has an idea.
Miner says that despite the combustible association of slurs like “flaming faggots” and the biblical story of God raining fire down upon the wicked sexual cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, that arson fits a larger pattern of passionate overkill committed against LGBT hate victims:

Attacks involving arson are especially brutal. Meticulous care is taken in carrying them out. The violence is heaped on. One mortal wound isn’t enough. Flesh must be pierced, ripped, and penetrated over and over. The bodies razed. These attacks are vicious. I’ve typed and deleted the word “inhuman” several times. “Inhuman” is inaccurate. I mean the exact opposite. These attacks are characteristically human. They are wrought with meaning — the offender wants there to be no doubt that this violence was intentional. In the case of hate crimes, it’s a warning. This is what happens when you are gay. This is what these people get — what they deserve.

So the attackers in each case basically want to make an example of their victims. The media coverage of such murders also serve as a warning to LGBTs around the world and as inspiration for the next copycat psycho.
We’re wondering what can possibly curb such violent symbolic acts or at least rally the community to take a stand against them.

    navigatethestream:

    TW FOR ANTI-GSM VIOLENCE

    adtvnow:

    Trans Woman Shelley Hilliard Died By Fire. Why The Deadly New Trend In Queer-Bashing?

     

    There’s a hot new trend in bashing LGBTs this fall and it involves setting them on fire. There have been at least four such attacks in the last three weeks—the latest being murdered trans woman Shelley Hilliard. But is there any reason behind this hateful trend? One expert thinks so. 

    First Steven Iorio’s “friends” doused him in rum and set him ablaze while he slept. After that, someone in Scotland tied Stuart Walker to a post and burned him to death. Then three punks gave Burke Burnett third-degree burns by tossing him onto a fire during a party.

    Now the latest victim in this ghastly trend is 19-year-old Shelley Hilliard, a Detroit trans woman whose charred corpse was identifiable only by the tattoo of cherries on her upper right arm.

    So what’s behind this ultra-cruel fad in burning queers? Phillip M. Miner of The Center for Homicide Research has an idea.

    Miner says that despite the combustible association of slurs like “flaming faggots” and the biblical story of God raining fire down upon the wicked sexual cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, that arson fits a larger pattern of passionate overkill committed against LGBT hate victims:

    Attacks involving arson are especially brutal. Meticulous care is taken in carrying them out. The violence is heaped on. One mortal wound isn’t enough. Flesh must be pierced, ripped, and penetrated over and over. The bodies razed. These attacks are vicious. I’ve typed and deleted the word “inhuman” several times. “Inhuman” is inaccurate. I mean the exact opposite. These attacks are characteristically human. They are wrought with meaning — the offender wants there to be no doubt that this violence was intentional. In the case of hate crimes, it’s a warning. This is what happens when you are gay. This is what these people get — what they deserve.

    So the attackers in each case basically want to make an example of their victims. The media coverage of such murders also serve as a warning to LGBTs around the world and as inspiration for the next copycat psycho.

    We’re wondering what can possibly curb such violent symbolic acts or at least rally the community to take a stand against them.

    (Source: adtvnation, via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

    — 2 years ago with 270 notes
    #appalling  #news  #civil rights  #basic human fucking decency  #let's not fucking murder people  #disgusting