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Lo. Likes fish, robots, necromancy, and long walks on the beach. This is my moodboard.
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    unexplained-events:

Being the only surgeon in the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, Leonid Rogozov (27) had to perform surgeory on himself when he found out that his appendix was inflamed and could burst any moment. With the assistance of a meteorologist and an engineer (and some local anesthesia) he removed his appendix. Bad ass

    unexplained-events:

    Being the only surgeon in the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, Leonid Rogozov (27) had to perform surgeory on himself when he found out that his appendix was inflamed and could burst any moment. With the assistance of a meteorologist and an engineer (and some local anesthesia) he removed his appendix. Bad ass

    (Source: unexplained-events)

    — 5 months ago with 7162 notes
    #medicine  #surgery  #history  #amazing  #russia  #soviet  #antartic  #expedition  #leonid rogozov  #queue 
    "[TW: graphic descriptions of violence, suicide, infanticide]

    Spaniards hunted Indians for sport and murdered them for dog food. Columbus, upset because he could not locate the gold he was certain was on the islands, set up a tribute system. Ferdinand Columbus described how it worked: ‘[The Indians] all promised to pay tribute to the Catholic Sovereigns every three months, as follows: In the Cibao, where the gold mines were, every person of 14 years of age or upward was to pay a large hawk’s bell of gold dust; all others were each to pay 25 pounds of cotton. Whenever an Indian delivered his tribute, he was to receive a brass or copper token which he must wear about his neck as proof that he had made his payment. Any Indian found without such a token was punished.’ With a fresh token, an Indian was safe for three months, much of which time would be devoted to collecting more gold. Columbus’ son neglected to mention how the Spaniards punished those whose tokens had expired: they cut off their hands.

    The tribute system eventually broke down because what it demanded was impossible. To replace it, Columbus installed the encomienda system, in which he granted or ‘commended’ entire Indian villages to individual colonists or groups of colonists. Since it was not called slavery, this forced-labor system escaped the moral censure that slavery received. Following Columbus’s example, Spain made the encomienda system official policy in Haiti in 1502; other conquistadors subsequently introduced it to Mexico, Peru, and Florida.

    The tribute and encomienda systems caused incredible depopulation. On Haiti the colonists made the Indians mine gold for them, raise Spanish food, and even carry them everywhere they went. The Indians couldn’t stand it. Pedro de Coroba wrote in a letter to King Ferdinand in 1517, ‘As a result of the sufferings and hard labor they endured, the Indians choose and have chosen suicide. Occasionally a hundred have committed mass suicide. The women, exhausted by labor, have shunned conception and childbirth … Many, when pregnant, have taken something to abort and have aborted. Others after delivery have killed their children with their own hands, so as not to leave them in such oppressive slavery.’"
    James W. Loewen, Lies My Teacher Told Me (via workandentropy)

    (via america-wakiewakie)

    — 6 months ago with 406 notes
    #Decolonization  #indigenous  #history 
    thesmithian:


Diego Rivera is under attack in Detroit. It’s not the first threat to the late Mexican artist’s famed murals, which depict the city’s steel factories with a not-quite-subtle anti-capitalist bent…But today the mural series is…one of many assets that the city could potentially sell off to pay back billions of dollars in long-term debts to Wall Street creditors.

more.

    thesmithian:

    Diego Rivera is under attack in Detroit. It’s not the first threat to the late Mexican artist’s famed murals, which depict the city’s steel factories with a not-quite-subtle anti-capitalist bent…But today the mural series is…one of many assets that the city could potentially sell off to pay back billions of dollars in long-term debts to Wall Street creditors.

    more.

    (via fylatinamericanhistory)

    — 9 months ago with 205 notes
    #diego rivera  #mexico  #detroit  #history  #detroit industry  #latin american art  #queue 
    A Guatemalan court has convicted a former dictator of genocide involving Mayans. More details: →

    shortformblog:

    A Guatemalan court has convicted former dictator Efrain Rios Montt on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity, sentencing him to 80 years in prison.

    The 86-year-old former general is the first former Latin American leader ever found guilty of such a charge.

    A three-judge tribunal issued the verdict after the nearly two-month trial in which dozens of victims testified about horrific atrocities.

    Rios Montt denies having knowledge of the massacres that happened involving indigenous people while he was in power.

    (via fylatinamericanhistory)

    — 11 months ago with 189 notes
    #history  #news  #guatemala  #efrain rios montt  #queue 
    "Everywhere in Latin America one finds a tremendous resentment of the United States, and that resentment is always strongest among the poorer and darker peoples of the continent. The life and destiny of Latin America are in the hands of United States corporations. The decisions affecting the lives of South Americans are ostensibly made by their government, but there are almost no legitimate democracies alive in the whole continent. The other governments are dominated by huge and exploitative cartels that rob Latin America of her resources while turning over a small rebate to a few members of the corrupt aristocracy, which in turn invests not in its own country for its own people’s welfare but in the banks of Switzerland and the playgrounds of the world."
    Martin Luther King, Jr., Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? (1967)

    (Source: fylatinamericanhistory, via fylatinamericanhistory)

    — 1 year ago with 1082 notes
    #history  #martin luther king  #united states  #20th c  #where do we go from here: chaos or community 
    The Second Amendment was Ratified to Preserve Slavery →

    invisiblelad:

    bapgeek:

    Side note: This nation has a history of seeking ways to disarm black people/people of color.

    I think this is a fitting response to the absolute moron who was talking about Dr. King, slavery and gun ownership earlier in the week. 

    From the Article: 

    The real reason the Second Amendment was ratified, and why it says “State” instead of “Country” (the Framers knew the difference - see the 10th Amendment), was to preserve the slave patrol militias in the southern states, which was necessary to get Virginia’s vote.  Founders Patrick Henry, George Mason, and James Madison were totally clear on that … and we all should be too.

    In the beginning, there were the militias. In the South, they were also called the “slave patrols,” and they were regulated by the states. 

    In Georgia, for example, a generation before the American Revolution, laws were passed in 1755 and 1757 that required all plantation owners or their male white employees to be members of the Georgia Militia, and for those armed militia members to make monthly inspections of the quarters of all slaves in the state.  The law defined which counties had which armed militias and even required armed militia members to keep a keen eye out for slaves who may be planning uprisings. 

    As Dr. Carl T. Bogus wrote for the University of California Law Review in 1998, “The Georgia statutes required patrols, under the direction of commissioned militia officers, to examine every plantation each month and authorized them to search ‘all Negro Houses for offensive Weapons and Ammunition’ and to apprehend and give twenty lashes to any slave found outside plantation grounds.”

    It’s the answer to the question raised by the character played by Leonardo DiCaprio in Django Unchained when he asks, “Why don’t they just rise up and kill the whites?”  If the movie were real, it would have been a purely rhetorical question, because every southerner of the era knew the simple answer: Well regulated militias kept the slaves in chains.

    (Source: geekbap, via descomic)

    — 1 year ago with 505 notes
    #slavery  #race and ethnicity  #history  #politics  #states rights (to be douchebags)  #2nd Amendment  #with citation 

    burnedshoes:

    © Gordon Parks, 1961, “The Flavio Story”, Rio de Janeiro

    #1: Twelve-year-old Flavio da Silva feeding his brother, Zacarias
    #2: Flavio is weary from caring for his brothers and sisters
    #3: Flavio’s brother Mario, crying after being bitten by a dog
    #4: Flavio amuses smaller brothers and sisters

    In 1961, Parks did a series for LIFE on the slums of Brazil and found himself in what he describes as “dead center in the worst poverty I have ever encountered—in the favela of Catacumba, a desolate mountainside outside of Rio de Janeiro.” In true Parks fashion, instead of giving a broad view without much depth, he focused on an individual affected by the larger story.

    Find the whole LIFE magazine story here.

    At just 12, Flavio da Silva was already dying, from tuberculosis. Flavio lived with his parents, brothers and sisters in a one-room shack. The images Parks created while living with the da Silva family illustrated the family’s reliance on their dying son. “What Flavio cared most about,” says Parks, “was that his younger brothers and sisters were taken care of. It was very noble of him. I definitely learned more from Flavio about character than Flavio learned from me.”

    “I am not afraid of death.” he explained earnestly to Parks. “But what will they do after?”

    After the story ran, LIFE readers contributed money to help with Flavio’s medical care. Parks says that people sent in roughly $30,000 to bring Flavio to America. “I went back to Brazil and the doctors told me that Flavio would die on my hands if I took him to America. I took him anyway and after living there for two years, he was cured.” When Flavio went back home to Brazil, Parks bought Flavio’s father a new truck with the money everyone had sent in, and then LIFE donated $25,000 so that Parks could help the family buy a new home.

    When Parks checked on Flavio 15 years later, he found a hard-working family man—with an almost obsessive desire to return to the United States. Flavio believed that he was still remembered and that he still had friends who would help him make something more of himself.

    Today, the obsession has faded. (…) Due to personal problems in his life, Flavio lost touch with Parks in 1987, but was reunited with the now 84-year-old photographer by telephone in 1996. They talked about Flavio’s family and his hard times and about the chances of getting together again.

    “I’ll never forget you,” Flavio told the man who made him famous.

    Parks went back to Brazil to visit Flavio for an special HBO was doing on the photographer in November 2000. Flavio has two young sons, a daughter and a grandchild. “Flavio’s very gracious,” Parks concludes. “He doesn’t beg for help or anything. He gave me a beautiful Bible when I went back to see him. He wants me to keep it for the rest of my life, which I will.” (+, +)

    O CRUZEIRO vs LIFE MAGAZINE

    Flavio was subjected to some kind of propaganda battle: On initial publication of Parks’s photographs, the Brazilian magazine “O Cruzeiro”, recognizing the documentation of Brazilian poverty as politically laden, “rushed one of its own photographers to New York City to do a similar story on a Puerto Rican family in the Wall Street district, and it depicted a sleeping child with cockroaches crawling over its face, and another child crying from hunger”.

    TIME, sibling to LIFE in Luce’s media empire, quickley encountered and revealed the O Cruzeiro story as fabrication. Parks remarks the irony that “O Cruzeiro had felt it necessary to go to such lenghts. If it had gone to New York’s Harlem or Chicago’s South Side, they could have found a story as genuinely tragic as the one of the Catacumba”. (source)

       (source: Brazilian magazine “O Cruzeiro” / Oct. 7, 1961)

    You can find more scans of the “O Cruzeiro” story here.

    The quotes come from the documentary Half Past Autumn: The Life and Work of Gordon Parks”. Read here a pdf excerpt from Park’s autobiography about meeting Flavio (thanks to Iconic Photos).

    Find previous posts about Gordon Parks here and here.

    (Source: burnedshoes, via fylatinamericanhistory)

    — 1 year ago with 382 notes
    #history  #brazil  #flavio  #gordon parks  #rio de janeiro  #united states  #time magazine  #o cruzeiro  #20th c 
    United States returns to Peru last Machu Picchu artefacts

    archaeologicalnews:

    The last of the artefacts taken from Machu Picchu by American archaeologist who rediscovered the Inca citadel have been returned to Peru.

    More than 35,000 pottery fragments and other pieces were flown from Yale University to the Andean city of Cusco.

    They had been taken to the US by archaeologist Hiram Bingham, who brought the site to international attention in 1911.

    The move completes a deal signed in 2010, following legal action by Peru.

    It argued that Bingham had only been loaned the artefacts.

    The American archaeologist and historian took to Yale some 46,000 ceramics, bone fragments and metal pieces.

    The first and second lots of artefacts arrived back in Peru last year.

    The best pieces will now be on display in a newly built museum in nearby Cusco. Read more.

    (via fylatinamericanhistory)

    — 1 year ago with 261 notes
    #history  #peru  #united states  #machu picchu  #archaeology  #hiram bingham  #20th c  #inca  #precolumbian  #indigenous