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Lo. Likes fish, robots, necromancy, and long walks on the beach. This is my moodboard.
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Professional-er Art Blog || Aquapunk || Transcostumers

twitter.com/CoronAndCo:


    Rolling Jubilee →

    A bailout of the people by the people

     

    Rolling Jubilee is a Strike Debt project that buys debt for pennies on the dollar, but instead of collecting it, abolishes it. Together we can liberate debtors at random through a campaign of mutual support, good will, and collective refusal. Debt resistance is just the beginning. Join us as we imagine and create a new world based on the common good, not Wall Street profits.

    -

    Okay, this is hella cool to me.

    — 1 year ago with 4 notes
    #occupy wall street  #ows  #people's bailout  #money  #debt 
    How Occupy Wall Street Tried To Co-Opt The Million Hoodie March →

    ladyatheist:

    I participated in the #MillionHoodies march in New York City’s Union Square this past Wednesday, March 21st. When I arrived I noticed a lot less hoodies than I thought I was going to see. I assumed this was simply because of the warm weather. There was still an enormous crowd of people there to deal with the tragedy that was Trayvon Martin.

    With chants of “We are the 99%” and signage to that effect as well, I was a little thrown off. I thought the purpose of this march was to bring awareness to the death of a young boy. Soon after the march started confusion was all around. Which way were we marching? Who was leading the charge? After we walked a few blocks members of the Occupy section of the march started running down the street knocking down trash cans. I was told later that some attempted to knock down police barricades and police scooters used to guide the marchers. I immediately became uncomfortable because that’s not what I signed up for. I wanted to speak out against injustice—just causing general destruction wasn’t on my agenda. Soon some Occupiers started chanting “F**k the POLICE,” one young white male wearing skinny jeans and a Justin Bieber haircut started yelling “THIS IS WAR, WE WANT WAR!” To which a hoodie-clad young black adult said “Hey, uh we don’t really want war, why don’t you tone that down. I’m about to graduate college in a few months.” The white male kind of laughed and kept moving forward yelling something else.

    At various points in the march, as organizers tried to make statements, they were drowned out by Occupiers chanting whatever they saw fit at the time. It didn’t matter if there was a full-on people’s mic happening, they would attempt to push things their way. I asked Daniel Maree, one of the organizers of the #millionhoodies march what he thought of the co-option by Occupy and their actions.”Honestly,” Maree replied “I feel like this is what happens when these emotions build up and they go unchecked and you know, injustice continues, you get it boiling over like this. I’m just happy nobody got hurt.” And while Occupy did help swell the ranks of marchers, I found their actions unacceptable.

    This isn’t simply about emotions. This is a consistent streak within certain sections of Occupy. Their goal isn’t a specific action within our current system. Often they want to make a point, show that they’re movement is doing things. In DC, their goal was to get arrested. In NYC, they seemed less concerned with marching for Trayvon and more concerned with occupying as much space as possible with whatever issue that would gather folks to their cause. Occupying.

    When Occupy Wall Street first got the national spotlight they were so worried about the co-option of their message, yet they have no problem co-opting others. A couple of Occupiers recognized me and asked if I noticed some of the nonsense that was happening. I said yes and one of them explained that after this march and two months of working with Occupy, she and her friends no longer wanted to be associated with them.

    Every time I attempt to have a conversation about issues within Occupy, I’m told that there are no leaders, and that some people do crazy things, but “that’s not OCCUPY.” I grow weary of actions without consequences and disrespect without anyone being held responsible. Just because a movement did some good doesn’t mean that it’s infallible. Occupy chapters have serious issues and there have been serious discussions about its relations with women and people of color. With incidents like what occurred on Wednesday, I see a clear reason why people of color don’t flock to the movement.

    We don’t have enough privilege to carry us through it.

    The bolded is so important. OWS is not infallible, perfect, or free from criticism. I’m beyond sick of people vilifying people who dare to criticize the movement. Occupy Wall Street is fundamentally flawed. You can’t keep putting your fingers in your ears and ignore the problems the movement has with racism and sexism.

    wowow. Shame on you, OWS.

    (via womanistgamergirl)

    — 2 years ago with 124 notes
    #ows  #occupy  #occupy wall street  #trayvon martin  #million hoodie march 

    theveganarchist:

    Five deaths have been reported in today’s Occupy Nigeria protests. (Three in Lagos, two in Kano.) Nigerians are calling for the removal of President Goodluck Jonathan. Their anger is in part a response to the removal of fuel subsidies, and in part an outright rejection of rampant government corruption. Many Nigerians live on less than $2 a day.

    (via fuckyeahfeminists)

    — 2 years ago with 112 notes
    #Nigeria  #Occupy  #OWS  #solidarity  #government corruption 
    The Fed: Secret Loans Highlight How The Rich Play By A Different Set Of Rules

    liberalsarecool:

    “The Federal Reserve and the big banks fought for more than two years to keep details of the largest bailout in U.S. history a secret…. The Fed didn’t tell anyone which banks were in trouble so deep they required a combined $1.2 trillion on Dec. 5, 2008, their single neediest day. Bankers didn’t mention that they took tens of billions of dollars in emergency loans at the same time they were assuring investors their firms were healthy. And no one calculated until now that banks reaped an estimated $13 billion of income by taking advantage of the Fed’s below-market rates, Bloomberg Markets magazine reports in its January issue.”

    This is the “99 v 1” dynamic in a nutshell. The ultra-rich play by a different set of rules.

    It’s a completely different world up there, folks. Now the question is, do we just sit back and “get used to it”?

    (via silas216)

    — 2 years ago with 30 notes
    #OWS  #99% 

    youthiswasted:

    Retired Philadelphia police captain Ray Lewis joined the #occupy protests in New York, and has been a highly visible and dignified presence in his uniform. He attracted the anger of the NYPD by speaking out against the NYPD’s use of violence on peaceful protesters. He has been arrested twice in the past week.

    Capt. Lewis has been a model of dignity, restraint, and humility. What police officers ought to be on their best days. What America is like on its best days.

    nonsensemachine:

    Philadelphia Police Capt. Ray Lewis joins Occupy Wall Street and talks about the NYPD (November 16, 2011)

    (via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

    — 2 years ago with 56 notes
    #ows  #occupy 
    "I was there to take down the names of people who were arrested… As I’m standing there, some African-American woman goes up to a police officer and says, ‘I need to get in. My daughter’s there. I want to know if she’s OK.’ And he said, ‘Move on, lady.’ And they kept pushing with their sticks, pushing back. And she was crying. And all of a sudden, out of nowhere, he throws her to the ground and starts hitting her in the head,” says Smith. “I walk over, and I say, ‘Look, cuff her if she’s done something, but you don’t need to do that.’ And he said, ‘Lady, do you want to get arrested?’ And I said, ‘Do you see my hat? I’m here as a legal observer.’ He said, ‘You want to get arrested?’ And he pushed me up against the wall."

    Retired New York Supreme Court Judge Karen Smith, working as a legal observer after the raids on Zucotti Park this Tuesday, via Paramilitary Policing of Occupy Wall Street: Excessive Use of Force amidst the New Military Urbanism (via seriouslyamerica

    )

    (via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

    — 2 years ago with 6368 notes
    #ows  #occupy 
    uncleclark:

OCCUPY WALLSTREET - POSTER

Someone needs to make a book out of all the amazing posters coming out of this and the proceeds would go to the movement.

    uncleclark:

    OCCUPY WALLSTREET - POSTER

    Someone needs to make a book out of all the amazing posters coming out of this and the proceeds would go to the movement.

    (Source: manelof, via occupywallstreetposters)

    — 2 years ago with 2603 notes
    #ows  #occupy  #art  #illustration 

    kateoplis:

    “Swarming Lower Manhattan tonight in unarrestable numbers is the only thing you’ll do more important than voting.” — @georgelazenby

    [photo: 1/2]

    (via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

    — 2 years ago with 336 notes
    #ows  #occupy Wall Street 
    thedailywhat:

Occupy Movement News Update of the Day: Scott Olsen, the 24-year-old Iraq War vet who was critically injured after being hit in the head by a police projectile during the October 25th raid on Occupy Oakland, has been released from the hospital.
Though he still suffers from a speech impediment, friends say he is “present, alert, and has a lot of energy.” Scott himself posted an update on Google+ yesterday to inform his supporters that he is feeling a lot better, but still has a ways to go before full recuperation.
“After my freedom of speech was quite literally taken from me, my speech is coming back but I’ve got a lot of work to do with rehab,” Scott wrote in his post. “Thank you for all your support, it has meant the world to me. You’ll be hearing more from me in the near future and soon enough we’ll see you in our streets!”
Meanwhile, the world Scott reenters is not much changed from the one he left behind three weeks ago. Oakland PD officially dismantled the Occupy Oakland tent city at Frank Ogawa Plaza in an early morning raid that saw 32 people arrested.
Unlike in previous raids, no injuries or clashes were reported, and many protesters, aware the eviction was imminent, packed up their belongings before the police arrived.
The fallout, however, was quick to come: Mayor Jean Quan’s legal adviser, Dan Siegel, announced his resignation on Facebook this morning, citing the raid and his support of Occupy Oakland, “not the 1% and its government facilitators.”
A smaller encampment at Snow Park remains in place for the time being.
Crackdowns on Occupy camps were a common sight over the weekend, as police dismantled month-old tent cities in Portland, Denver, St. Louis, and Salt Lake City.
Some 100 people were arrested in all.
[image: scottolsen.]

    thedailywhat:

    Occupy Movement News Update of the Day: Scott Olsen, the 24-year-old Iraq War vet who was critically injured after being hit in the head by a police projectile during the October 25th raid on Occupy Oakland, has been released from the hospital.

    Though he still suffers from a speech impediment, friends say he is “present, alert, and has a lot of energy.” Scott himself posted an update on Google+ yesterday to inform his supporters that he is feeling a lot better, but still has a ways to go before full recuperation.

    “After my freedom of speech was quite literally taken from me, my speech is coming back but I’ve got a lot of work to do with rehab,” Scott wrote in his post. “Thank you for all your support, it has meant the world to me. You’ll be hearing more from me in the near future and soon enough we’ll see you in our streets!”

    Meanwhile, the world Scott reenters is not much changed from the one he left behind three weeks ago. Oakland PD officially dismantled the Occupy Oakland tent city at Frank Ogawa Plaza in an early morning raid that saw 32 people arrested.

    Unlike in previous raids, no injuries or clashes were reported, and many protesters, aware the eviction was imminent, packed up their belongings before the police arrived.

    The fallout, however, was quick to come: Mayor Jean Quan’s legal adviser, Dan Siegel, announced his resignation on Facebook this morning, citing the raid and his support of Occupy Oakland, “not the 1% and its government facilitators.”

    A smaller encampment at Snow Park remains in place for the time being.

    Crackdowns on Occupy camps were a common sight over the weekend, as police dismantled month-old tent cities in Portland, Denver, St. Louis, and Salt Lake City.

    Some 100 people were arrested in all.

    [image: scottolsen.]

    (Source: thedailywhat, via socialistexan)

    — 2 years ago with 699 notes
    #scott olsen  #occupy  #ows  #police brutality